Tag Archives: Wine

Gypsy Canyon Angelica

While researching Santa Barbara I came across a very small winery that only produces three hundred and fifty cases per year called Gypsy Canyon.  The draw was one of the two wines made here – a dessert wine called Angelica.

 

I’ll begin with some geography.  Two mountain ranges form the north and south borders of the Santa Ynez Valley.  They funnel the cool ocean air and fog into the region.  The cooler, western portion of the valley has been granted its own region called Santa Rita Hills.  Canyons run between those mountains and are generally a bit warmer, especially as one moves away from the coast.  Gypsy Canyon is on the northern side of the valley and is closer to the ocean than most, but the morning fogs do not always make their way up the canyon to the vineyard.  

 

Gypsy CanyonDeborah Hall originally intended to plant a few acres of Pinot Noir to sell the local winemakers, but while the vines were being planted, some nearby brush was cleared to reveal an old vineyard of scraggly vines.  They were identified as a grape called Mission, which was originally brought to California by Spanish missionaries.  After researching the history of her property, she concluded that the vines were probably planted in 1887; that makes it the oldest vineyard in Santa Barbara County.

 

In the modern wine making era Mission has fallen out of favor because the table wine it produces has little character.  Deborah thought it a crime to let these old vines go unused, so she looked to the history of the missionaries for inspiration.  The mission in Santa Barbara has collected the annals from all the missions in California.  There she read correspondence among missionaries about the various wines they produced.  

 

Mission is a red-skinned grape, so it can be used to produce red and white wine.  For sacramental purposes, a table wine was produced.  The missionaries also made a wine for themselves and their guests called Angelica.  Deborah decided to make her own wines and resurrect this long lost style.  She follows the historic model as closely as she can.

 

The grapes for Angelica were left to hang on the vine as long as nature would allow, making them as ripe and as sweet as possible.  For Deborah, the Mission is harvested in the middle of December.  Both red and white versions of Angelica were made, but the white was more highly prized.  For the white, the grapes were pressed and the skins were quickly removed.  Halfway through the fermentation the wine was fortified with grape spirit, which raised the alcohol content, killed the yeast and protected the wine from oxygen.  This left some degree of sweetness in the partially-fermented wine.  

 

After fortification, it was transferred into barrels.  Typically a wine barrel is filled to the top to prevent oxygen from getting to the wine, but the Angelica barrels were only half-full.  This allowed oxygen to turn the wine an amber color and change the fruit characteristics.  When they were ready for a new batch of bottles, they blended wines from a few years to increase the complexity in what was akin to a solera system in Spain.

 

Deborah’s homage is an amber color with ruby highlights.  It tastes like butterscotch, toffee, sour cherries and orange-flavored liqueur.  In keeping with the historic theme, she sought out a glassmaker to individually craft each bottle.  The labels are handmade and the neck is dipped in beeswax.  She also signs every bottle.  

 

Her Pinot Noir is in similar packaging.  It was a very elegant style, perhaps the lightest I have had on the journey.  I would have never guessed that she had been working with wine, let alone a grape as difficult as Pinot Noir, for less than ten years.

 

Too few wines in California are able to claim a sense of the state’s viticultural history, and even less live up to the quality of the reputation.  Deborah’s Angelica succeeds on both fronts.

 

 

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Producers, Uncategorized

Scouring The Central Coast

For the time being I have put Los Angeles and Santa Barbara in my rearview mirror.  I left with a much more positive view of L.A. than I expected.  The most intriguing cultural aspect is the extent to which the “industry” permeates daily life; many people act as though they are auditioning every time they walk out the door.  The culture and the weather allow Angelenos to wear anything they want – you can never be the most bizarre looking person on the streets of LA.

I would be remiss to head north before extending a fervent thank you to my friends Doug and Pam Niedzwiecki for their support and hospitality.  The journey would have a very different dynamic were it not for them and I am in their debt.

P5152057My last days in Santa Barbara were dedicated to the Santa Maria Valley AVA.  Like the Santa Rita Hills to the south, its vineyards are planted as far to the west as the climate will allow.  Most of the best-known vineyards are on a south-facing bench of the mountains.  Byron, Cambria and Kenneth Volk, collectively the oldest and largest of the county’s wineries, hail from these hills.

Any list of top flight Santa Barbara producers would surely include Au Bon Climat and Qupé, which are operated by Jim Clendennon and Bob Lindquist, respectively.  Their shared production facility lies within the Bien Nacido vineyard.  Au Bon Climat focuses on grapes from Burgundy and Qupé on those from the Rhone.

I arrived for a visit on Friday morning that began with barrel samples of the 2008 vintage.  The most interesting was the Qupé Roussanne from Bien Nacido.  It was creamy, but had a piquant acidity atypical of Roussanne.  Perhaps that is a stage of the wine’s development that will change over time.  I will be checking back in on it.

My favorite wine of the day was a white called ‘Hildegard’.  While teaching classes in my Wine Merchant days I often poured wine from a vineyard called Corton-Charlemagne because I enjoy its etymology.  Charlemagne’s favorite wine was from a hill in Burgundy called Corton.  Late in life he had a long gray beard that became stained when he drank the red wine.  His wife, Hildegard, found that to be unsightly so she had a large portion of the vineyard converted to white grapes so he could enjoy Corton and look good doing so.  That parcel is now called Corton-Charlemagne.  The ‘Hildegard’ at Au Bon Climat is a blend of Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc and Aligoté, which are thought to be the grapes used in Charlemagne’s day.

My final appointment in Santa Barbara turned out to be the most hospitable. Rather than meeting at a vineyard, winery or tasting room, I spoke with Lane Tanner and her husband Ariki Hill around their kitchen table overlooking the valley.

P5162064Lane has always been dedicated to Pinot Noir;  her car is burgundy.  Before founding her own label, she was the winemaker at the Hitching Post.  We tasted her 1987 Hitching Post Sierra Madre Vineyard, which she said used to be a better vineyard.  Even after twenty years the wine had plenty of ripe fruit which was surrounded by the leather and herb notes that come with that much time in bottle.  We compared it to her 2007 Lane Tanner Bien Nacido, which showed the ripeness and concentration that 2007 is known for, but was still crafted in the elegant style that Lane advocates.

Ariki is from Australia and is also a winemaker.  His winery is Labyrinth and he makes wine in both countries.  He comes from the Yarra Valley in Victoria, where drought and bush fires caused massive damage to the crop six months ago.  Like Lane, Ariki loves to work with Pinot Noir.  We had his 2005 Pinot from the Yarra Valley.  It was one of the rare Australian Pinots that I have had and it was quite good.  It had a strong red cherry nose.  Ariki said that the clay soils of the region make for more subdued aromatics.

I find Santa Barbara to be a fascinating wine scene.  It is a young region – many of the founding personalities are still living and working in the appellation. The various meso-climates allow grape varieties from throughout Europe to be planted.  In the vineyards closest to the ocean, the growing season is the longest in the world.  The Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from these extraordinary sites have redefined my idea of California wine.

The wines of Santa Barbara will only get better as their vineyards mature.  In the mean time they are struggling through the busted Sideways bubble.  The popularity of the wine was so great that they raised the price until the market could not support it.  Now winemakers are holding on to expensive juice that the consumers would love to drink, but not at $50 per bottle.

On Saturday it was time to hit the 101 and head north to the Santa Lucia Highlands in Monterey County.  My next realm of interest lies between here and San Francisco.  Some of the regions, like the Santa Lucia Highlands, are well regarded and well known, but many of the AVAs in the Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz Counties are small and obscure.  I began with a broad overview of the Highlands at a gala event.

One of the best known producers in the area is Hahn Estates.  On Saturday they hosted the Santa Lucia Highlands Gala Tasting, a public event for 300 people.  Thirty producers were on display, so it provided an overview of the appellation.  From previous experience I was familiar with eleven of the wineries and I was able to sample most of those I had not tried before.  The tasting conditions were difficult; outside in a hot and crowded tent.  Most of the wines were too warm and the alcohol levels, which are generally high to excessive in the SLH, were particularly potent on this day.  Two wineries made an especially good impression on me and I’ll be attempting to visit with them in the coming days.

P5162069It was time for a return to the most beautiful place I had ever seen.  I was fifteen at the time when our family came to California for two wonderful weeks.  No amount of words, pictures or memories can do justice to the scenes south of Monterey on Highway One  – but I’ll be happy to try.

P5162095These are stubborn mountains that refuse to be swept into the ocean; their beaches washed away long ago.  The waters are clear, you can see the ocean floor for a few hundred yards.  Every shade of blue and green mingle with each other in the water.  The vegetation is lush.  The air is mild and a bit damp.  The road is narrow and dangerous.  I finally saw the great California sunset that I had been longing for since the day I arrived.  I slept on the side of the road at one of the many places you can pull off to take in the sights.

PisoniMy Sunday began with a slow exit from Highway One as I returned to the Santa Lucia Highlands for a cookout at the Pisoni Family Vineyard.  The family have been in the area for generations and were early adopters of the vine.  Their vineyards are tucked into a canyon with a warmer climate than those out on the bench.  We didn’t talk much about the wines, but we sure tasted plenty since the price of admission was an open bottle.  One couple was celebrating their anniversary and sharing their Ruinart (!) as well.  I brought a great rosé given to me by Mike Whitehead and made by Charles Smith of Washington and Charles Bieler of The Three Thieves.  Lunch was chicken, beef and sausage with asparagus on the side paired with lots of Pisoni wine out of magnum bottles for over 50 guests.

The next morning I learned that if I keep my sunroof open all night, my battery dies.  Luckily a tow truck with a powerful battery was nearby to jump the car.

It was time to hit San Francisco to visit with my uncle’s family for a couple of days.  Parking there is a nightmare so he let me pull into his garage and forget about the car.  It felt great to do some walking.  He lives in the Castro district, which is where I did my exploring the first evening.  I found a wine bar called Swirl where I enjoyed a glass of Bastianich Friuliano (formerly called Tokay Friuliano before the Hungarians beat them in court) which was a great sipping wine – no food necessary.

YodaSpeaking of food, I returned to my uncle’s home for a pork tenderloin dinner paired with a bottle from Rasteau.  The next day I set out on foot, determined to absorb the city by walking across it.  I felt the need for pictures of the Golden Gate bridge, which is five hilly miles from the Castro.  It took a couple hours, but I found a wise sage who said, “If going to San Francisco, you are, to wear flowers in your hair be sure.  Herh herh herh.”

Golden GateThe day had been foggy to begin with, so I was uncertain that the walk would yield a decent picture.  Over the course of my time on the street, the air cleared and by the time I arrived the bridge was in full, sunny regalia.

During a break in the walk, I was catching up on Eric Asimov’s blog and learned of a wine bar called Terroir located downtown.  They were hosting a tasting with Catherine Breton, a producer from Chinon in the Loire Valley where I had visited last year.  The Cabernet Francs were laden with green herbs, spices and dark berry fruits.  The shop had great merchandising, with empty display bottles lining the walls and the stock in the cellar.  They only deal with organic wine, mainly from Europe.

Just up the street on Folsom is a unique business that could really catch on.  It is called City Beer and it is set up like the typical wine bar with beer instead.  They had a great selection and owner Craig Wathen is well versed in his wares.  He and his wife, Beth, are the sole proprietors and employees.

P5212202I left town yesterday to return to the central coast.  I am wrapping up this week’s article on the shores of Monterey Bay as I prepare to head into Carmel Valley to taste some wine with Damien Georis.

For more photos from the week, click here.

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Pinch Me

Santa YnezCould things get any better?

For the first time this week I was awake before Doug and Pam.  No, I haven’t been burning the candle at both ends; I’ve simply grown to appreciate the comfort of a good mattress.  Today was my first foray into Santa Barbara wine country.  I had an appointment with Andrew Murray of Andrew Murray Vineyards at 10 o’clock so I had to get moving early.

Escaping LA was uneventful (thanks in no small part to the GPS that Doug and Pam let me borrow); though I’m sure that the poor souls sitting in traffic going the opposite direction would hate to hear me say that.  After I hit the 101, which follows the coast before running for the hills, one scene after another left me shaking my head with an ear-to-ear smile.  Mountains falling into the ocean followed by high-county lakes and hills draped in vineyards.

Which One Will It Be?Andrew was the first person to reply to my requests for a visit and he was also the most empathetic, having gone through periods of wanderlust himself.  The typical winery appointment consists of a tour of the winemaking facilities and a tasting of the produce.  To make the experience more unique, Andrew took me on a tour of the eastern end of the Santa Ynez Valley, where grapes native to the Rhone Valley thrive.   We visited two vineyards, Thompson and Watch Hill, to inspect the early season development of the vines.  Keep an eye out for an upcoming post that will chronicle the tour.

Andrew Murray has a tasting room in the small town of Los Olivos.  After my time with him I went into town to taste his wines and mingle with the tourist set.  In 1998, his tasting room was the third to open in the small town.  After Sideways put the spotlight on the Santa Barbara scene, the number of tasting rooms grew to fourteen.  Now a town with one stop sign is the favorite imbibery of LA’s weekend warriors.  I heard horror stories – people were dumping the spit buckets on their heads on a regular basis.  No lie!

At three o’clock I traveled the short distance to Buellton, another Sideways setting.  Just off the highway is a new multi-million dollar venture for boutique wine production called Terravant.  Ken Brown is an eponymous husband-and-wife operation that uses the facilities for wine-making and storage; their offices are on the property as well.  Ken is one of Santa Barbara’s wine pioneers.  He worked at Zaca Mesa from 1977 until 1984 when he founded the Byron Winery.  He sold Byron to Mondavi in 1990 and stayed on to manage the wines through 2004.  We had an enlightening two-hour conversation and tasting in his office.  We talked about the growing conditions in Santa Barbara, the history of California wine and the advancements that have been made in the vineyards over the course of his career.

Hitching PostAs I left Ken Brown in the late afternoon, I came across the Hitching Post restaurant of Sideways fame.  They make their own wines and serve them by the glass.  I had the 2006 St. Rita’s Earth with grilled quail and mashed Wild Turkey sweet potatoes.  The dish was an excellent pair with the Pinot, but it worked even better with the 1985 Chateau Palmer.  How did I end up with Palmer?  I sat at the bar next to an off-duty waitress whose customer had brought it the night before along with a 1978 Leoville-Las Cases.  They didn’t finish the bottles, so I had the leftovers.  Not much of the 78, but at least I got a taste.  Over half the bottle of Palmer remained and I shared it with another wine tourist sitting on the other side of me.  The staff didn’t care for the wine, saying it was too heavy for their tastes.  More for me!

Now I’m off to complete the day with a viewing of Wolverine before finding a rest area to try out my latest theory on comfortable car sleep.  We’ll see what this passenger seat is capable of!

1 Comment

Filed under Producers, Travel, Uncategorized

Kief-Joshua Vineyards

homelogoOn my jaunt through the Sonoita AVA in southern Arizona, I came across a budding young winery that shows potential.  I would not normally make that assertion without tasting the produce of the vineyards, but in the case of Kief-Joshua, that is not possible.

Kief Manning planted his first vines on “winery row” in 2005.  It takes three years for the vine to produce a commercial crop, thus the 2008 harvest, which will be released this fall, was the first on the estate.  To sustain themselves on the path toward 100% estate production, the winery purchases grapes and juice from California and Arizona.  They currently feature Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and a blend of Nebbiolo, Sangiovese and Tempranillo.  New plantings are progressing at an acre per year and the vineyard is expected to fully supply the winery’s grapes within a decade.  He has planted an eclcectic range of ten varieties: Tempranillo, Mourvedre, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, Chenin Blanc, Syrah, Zinfandel, Reisling, Semillion and Viognier.

Kief has created a sustainable model for his vineyards – foregWinery KJoing the use of pesticides and herbicides.  He was trained in biodynamic viticulture in Australia, and he has adopted many of its principles.  He said he will never be able to put the term “biodynamic” on his labels because his estate cannot produce enough fertilizer for its needs.  Everything on an official biodynamic estate must come from the property.

I have been attracted to the idea of biodynamics because it emphasizes symbiotic relationships as a substitute for chemicals.  In the case of Kief-Joshua, they promote the presence of praying mantis, owls and hawks to control pests.  My favorite animal that they employ are the Baby Doll Sheep.  Full grown these mini-munchers stand two feet tall, too short to reach the grapes, but the perfect height to feed on weeds and grass.

Mini MuncherThe combination of thoughtful viticulture and well made wines (albeit from other sources) promises a bright future for Kief-Joshua.  I will be checking back in with them regularly.

Leave a comment

Filed under Producers, The Winery, Travel, Uncategorized

Thank you, Annie and Simon

p4181876Today I depart Carefree, Arizona where I have spent the better part of four days in the vicinity of the swimming pool.  This break has provided a chance to decide how I want to go about this expedition.  I was only able to take this time because of Simon and Annie Lehrer, who have been excellent hosts.  Check out Annie’s website – cheesemongerswife.com

We went to the local wine shop, AZ Wine, on Saturday night for a Bourbon and Barbecue tasting.  It was a great line up.  Buffalo Trace, Blanton’s and Woodford Reserve were the highlights.  I picked up a Marsannay Rosé from Regis Bouvier that was great for the hot tub [I have yet to try a Marsannay Rosé that wasn’t worth the money ($16)], a bottle of Segura Viudas (for $8) and the find of the trip thus far – Domaine de Canton.

p4181875Canton is ginger-flavored and is the sister liqueur to St. Germain, which is rare in Missouri because none of the distributors are representing it as of yet.  Every now and then, we got our hands on St. Germain, which is a slightly sweet, elderflower liqueur, but I had never even seen a picture of the Canton bottle.  I like the St. Germain on its own, on the rocks or in mixed drinks that include some orange liqueur.  The Canton does not do nearly as well by itself.  It is drier than the St. Germain and the ginger lends a spiciness that needs to be tempered.  We started with Canton Royales – four parts Segura Viudas Sparkling Wine and one part Canton.  It helped spread out the flavorful liqueur, but did not provide any extra complexity.  Simon’s concoction added triple sec to the mix which gave it the citrus notes it had needed.

I’m off to Elgin, Arizona in the Sonoita AVA where I’ll be asking, “What’s the deal with your monsoon season?”

4 Comments

Filed under Drinks, Travel

Novy Nebbiolo and Siduri Pinots

siduri1Adam Lee and his wife Diana are the family behind the Siduri and Novy labels that hail from Santa Rosa, California.  They do not own vineyards; rather, they source grapes from growers with whom they contract.  These contracts allow for some influence on the vines.  Siduri is the label they dedicate to Pinot Noir and the Novy wines encompass Chardonnay, Syrah, Zinfandel and Grenache.  It is also the label they use for “hobby wines”.  Diana has a late-harvest Viognier (which I have not tasted) and Adam’s is the Nebbiolo from Stolpman Vineyard.

Today was my first opportunity to try Adam’s homage to Piedmont from the 2006 vintage.  Anise was the most prominent aroma.  The tannins had a good deal of grip, but they were not aggressive.  It’s body was no fuller than some of the Pinot Noir on offer.  For me, it redefined the potential quality of an Italian grape grown in California.

The most striking Pinot Noir was the 2007 Muirfield Vineyard from the Willamette Valley.  The vintage was made very difficult by rain throughout the harvest and I’ve been underwhelmed by the majority its produce.  Adam and Diana chose to “bleed off” twenty percent of the juice from the first pressing, resulting in a more concentrated wine.  The result is a very complex, earthy Pinot Noir that lingered long on the palate

.Adam Lee and Jeff Birkemeier

1 Comment

Filed under Producers, Tastings

1845 Madeira!

1845 Cossart Gordon Madeira Bual Solera, Bottled in 1971

Last night I had the fortune of tasting wine from t1845 Cossart Gordonhe 19th century.  Madeira is the immortal wine; impervious to heat and oxygen, which it is subjected to over many years of aging in large barrels called pipes.  The Cossart Gordon spent one-hundred and twenty-six years baking, oxidizing and evaporating in its barrel before it was finally bottled.

Madeira is an island in the Atlantic that falls under Portugal’s jurisdiction.  It was a major stop on colonial trade routes.  Early wines produced on the island deteriorated before they reached their destination.  It was only after the practice of fortification became widely used that the true potential of Madeira was revealed.  It was found that the wines tasted considerably better after rolling around in the hull of ships going to destinations around the world.  It was the most popular beverage in the American colonies – it is the wine that was used to toast the Declaration of Independence.

My last post was a rant on the ridiculous nature of tasting notes so I’ll do my best to maintain my dignity through this one:  It was as brown as coffee and the legs never fell from the glass.  The nose and texture were akin to maple syrup.  It was sweet, but not cloying.  For as high of an alcohol content as it had, it did not burn the palate like port often does.  In a word – delicious!

It served as the climax of a wonderful meal at The American Restaurant in Kansas City.  Due to its indestructible nature, Madeira is able to be offered by the glass.  It was an ideal accompaniment to the dark chocolate tort we had for dessert.

Leave a comment

Filed under Tastings